The Magnolia Story

This eBook includes the full text of the book plus

You are here: Home - Books - We Always Treat Women Too Well


We Always Treat Women Too Well

We Always Treat Women Too Well By Raymond Queneau Barbara Wright John Updike We Always Treat Women Too Well We Always Treat Women Too Well was first published as a purported work of pulp fiction by one Sally Mara but this novel by Raymond Queneau is a further manifestation of his sly provocative wonderfu

  • Title: We Always Treat Women Too Well
  • Author: Raymond Queneau Barbara Wright John Updike
  • ISBN: 9781590170304
  • Page: 304
  • Format: Paperback
  • We Always Treat Women Too Well By Raymond Queneau Barbara Wright John Updike We Always Treat Women Too Well was first published as a purported work of pulp fiction by one Sally Mara, but this novel by Raymond Queneau is a further manifestation of his sly, provocative, wonderfully wayward genius Set in Dublin during the 1916 Easter rebellion, it tells of a nubile beauty who finds herself trapped in the central post office when it is seized by a groWe Always Treat Women Too Well was first published as a purported work of pulp fiction by one Sally Mara, but this novel by Raymond Queneau is a further manifestation of his sly, provocative, wonderfully wayward genius Set in Dublin during the 1916 Easter rebellion, it tells of a nubile beauty who finds herself trapped in the central post office when it is seized by a group of rebels But Gertie Girdle is no common pushover, and she quickly devises a coolly lascivious strategy by which, in very short order, she saves the day for king and country Queneau s wickedly funny send up of cheap smut his response to a popular bodice ripper of the 1940s exposes the link between sexual fantasy and actual domination while celebrating the imagination s power to transmute crude sensationalism into pleasure pure and simple.
    We Always Treat Women Too Well By Raymond Queneau Barbara Wright John Updike

    • Unlimited We Always Treat Women Too Well - by Raymond Queneau Barbara Wright John Updike
      304 Raymond Queneau Barbara Wright John Updike

    One thought on “We Always Treat Women Too Well

    1. Jacob on said:

      Yes, my girl, it means that you ve got to keep quiet About what Why We re heroes, and not swine Got it Perhaps Of course you ve got it If it hadn t been for you we d have been dead without any trouble, but, just because you went to have a pee at the precise moment of our insurrection, our glory may well be tarnished by vile gossip and filthy slander We Always Treat Women Too Well, p 163 Funny how going to the loo at the wrong time can ruin everyone s day It s 1916, the Easter Rising, and seven I [...]

    2. Cphe on said:

      An offering from the New York Review Books Classic list, which has introduced this reader to a lot of gems, interesting books and vastly different authors.It was the quirky title that piqued my interest because I d certainly never come across the author s name before There is already a substantive synopsis on offer so no point in my rehashing.I know that many readers have rated this shorter novel far higher but it didn t quite gel with me even though I love books set in Ireland and I love the pe [...]

    3. MJ Nicholls on said:

      This novel parodies cheap noir novels being sold by the shovel in the 1940s Holed up in a Dublin post office, a group of Irish rebels hold hostage the canny temptress Gertie Girdle, and one by one, as the English crush their insurgency, fall sway to her peculiar charms Dismissed as a crude failure upon publication, Queneau s pseudonymous novel certainly lards sex and swearing into the action than in his screwball comedies, but the parody is clearly delineated from the ludicrous dialogue and the [...]

    4. Chuck LoPresti on said:

      If a coherent Alfred Jarry wrote Dog Day Afternoon after reading Joyce you would end up something like this This is a dirty little book that is a one sit read for most Reading the description you might think there s better use of your time than literary smut but you d be doing yourself a disservice to miss this Not quite as depraved as Bataille s Story of the Eye and not as cheap as Pulp Fiction the pleasure in this book derives from Queneau s ability to handle a plot with his ever present wit A [...]

    5. Glyven on said:

      Though it s undoubtedly less outrageous today than it would have been in 1947, Queneau s funny and subversive satire is perhaps easier to appreciate in a time when things like ambiguity of sexual consent, genital mutilation, and mid coital bodily rending might provide fodder for dark humor in films and television What distinguishes Queneau s treatment of such material is his amusingly discreet approach a passive reader might not even catch his description of, say, an act of fellatio, which lurk [...]

    6. Jim on said:

      This satirical French novel about the Irish Rebellion is a bit too oddball to be taken seriously, but it is rather fun to read A number of Irish rebels take over the fictitious post office at Eden Quay, killing several of the employees in the process Before long, they start striking attitudes as brave and highly principled rebels, when suddenly it is discovered that one of the female employees has locked herself in the loo In no time at all, she is dragged out Although she is supposedly virginal [...]

    7. Fred on said:

      queneau parodies bad writing in every conceivable aspect, taking the overt form of a ludlumesque action thriller the evil twin brother of exercises in style

    8. Dan Keating on said:

      Raymond Queneau s satirical work of pulp fiction is a subtle study in minimalism it s easy to miss the satire if you re not paying close attention, at least not until about halfway through the story The story s cheerful amorality will definitely bother some, as it is a story of a girl who decides to use her sexuality as a subtle weapon against her enemies and who is, in turn, raped multiple times Despite these violent acts being visited upon her, Gertie Girdle yes, that s really her name continu [...]

    9. Frank on said:

      Mai prima di questo avevo letto un libro di Raymond Queneau, dunque non sapevo cosa aspettarmi da questo autore, anche perch le uniche mie conoscenze facevano riferimento ad Esercizi di stile che con questo Troppo buoni con le donne non c entra nulla.Da buon appassionato di storia irlandese sono rimasto stregato dall ambientazione e dalle primissime pagine che proiettano il lettore nel pieno dell insurrezione repubblicana del 1916 nell ufficio postale di Dublino.Con il procedere degli eventi ci [...]

    10. Andrew on said:

      Perhaps it is wrong to judge a book written seventy years ago by our own modern moral expectations however as I read this book I found the casual treatment of sexual assaults in a humorous fashion as distasteful I read the introduction of this classic explaining that this book is a satire of the American pot boilers of the forties and fifties with it s casual mistreatment of women and that Gertie is an ironic heroine however for me it didn t work and it simply felt exploitative I don t even thin [...]

    11. Pečivo on said:

      Na ensk je lov k kr tkej, je Queneaova zde op t po n jak dob sklo ovac syndrom kanadsk ho brank e Patrika Royeho kr tk pr za o tom, e je lov k na ensk kr tkej M m r d tyhle knihy, kdy p b h rovnou obsahuje pointu knihy, tak jako t eba Jak se plave ke dnu od Jirky Pomejeho.Tento p b h se odehr v b hem prvn sv tov v lky, chv li p ed vznikem Irsk republiky Irsk rebelov spolejhaj na to, e britsk flotily maj na pr ci drancovat n koho jin ho a tak v Dublinu za nou obsazovat britsk ady Queneau se soust [...]

    12. aloveiz on said:

      Could anything this well named be bad Of course not I heard about this by way of somebody s very distraught ex secret boyfriend who related to the title rather personally The form here is unique The characters are undescribed and undeveloped they are just names that things happen to They have little in common outside of their decision to collectively wage a war against their oppressors This only makes the story exemplary.I am fascinated by the fact that Queneau originally published this book un [...]

    13. Yogodot on said:

      I read this book nearly 30 years ago and absurd images from it still haunt me I m the first to agree that Queneau was a genius, for Elements of Style, The Bark Tree, and The Last Days, and I have nothing against parody or satire as such, but this story doesn t connect with any of his other works The effect is juvenile in the extreme, a quality which Queneau shares with Alfred Jarry, but really it s the title and the attitude it pronounces upon the subject which makes it reckless and belligerent [...]

    14. William on said:

      this is kind of snubbed by Queneau scholars i seem to run into these types of novels often but that s because i ve found the novelists that i like, and you can t win em all when you come to their novels this one has a great story though nowhere near as amazing as Zazie in the Metro or Pierrot Mon Ami, but that s by Queneau standards by normal standards, this deserves the four point rating i say the same of this as i said of Exercises in Style also Queneau read if you re a Queneau fan

    15. Andrew on said:

      From the back cover blurb this promised to be a dark tale with an erotic subtext, but unfortunately it s a farce in many senses of the word and never gets as interesting as it might have done It s difficult to see why this French writer would have written such a book and it is impossible to give a hoot about any of the characters It might be funny, but it didn t appeal to my sense of humour or rather, the writing style didn t appeal Flooded with stereotypes and littered with misogyny I was bored [...]

    16. David on said:

      Sometimes time just passes a book by This has its moments, but it primarily a curiousity at this point Yes, yes, I understand Queneau a smart and creative author was spoofing a particularly low class style of sadistic erotic thriller And he does that well, and there are definitely some funny little toss offs along the way.But is it worth the read at this point, 60 years later I don t know Maybe I guess I read it It s quick, and definitely has its coldheartedly funny moments I ve just talked myse [...]

    17. Skye on said:

      this bizarre send up of hostage drama written in 1948 has a great conceit Irish rebels storm a post office of English sympathizers They removed all the workers except one Gertie Girdle Erotic violent chaos ensues All the rebels names are taken from Ulysses and they shout finnegan s wake as a salute Despite it being very funny in parts, it s a bit of a let down But, it s pretty short if you re that curious.

    18. Illy on said:

      Wonderfully bizarre with quite possibly the oddest punchline I have ever encountered The back summary describes it as a send up of 1940s pulp erotica, and in that aim it did a fabulous job one can t help but to simultaneously laugh and squirm uncomfortably during certain scenes between Gertie and the Irish rebels holding her hostage within the Dublin post office Wickedly hilarious and just a fun and quick read overall.

    19. Van on said:

      This was actually a great follow up to Ulysses because all of the character s names, some locations,and the text are a parody of Joyce s works I had no idea that was the case when I chose to read this though The style reads sort of like Joyce meets Quentin Tarantino with maybe a slight dash of Douglass Adams If that sounds like a strange mix, it is, but it works quite well It s absurd and interesting and funny I recommend it.

    20. Bridget on said:

      This book might have felt relevant if I gave two shits about James Joyce but I don t It does however prove my point that you don t have to like Object A s influences B C to like Object A in popular music, A would equal the White Stripes and B would equal Robert Johnson and C would equal ever obscure blues musician captured by Ken Burns Having not read much Joyce, this book was nonetheless engaging, funny, and a bit slutty all qualities I enjoy in the world.

    21. Jim on said:

      Le corps continua quelques secondes encore son mouvement rythmique, tout comme le male de la mante religieuse dont la partie superieure a ete a moitie devoree par la femelle et qui persevere dans la copulation p 156 Une petite nouvelle pleine d humour et de sexe sur un fond de guerre civile irlandaise dans le style des livres de pulp fiction des annees 1940s.

    22. Troy on said:

      A hilarious and smutty joke, much like Boris Vian s ridiculous noirs Just try to read the opening lining with some twit shouting God Save the Queen and ending up puking blood out of a newly acquired eighth orifice without laughing and plunging full speed ahead into this dark sick joke of a book.

    23. Elie on said:

      Queneau s homage to Joyce s Dublin was much fun than I expected An English hussy hides in the bathroom during a Republican raid on a bank, and as they decide the most honorable way of getting rid of her, manages to guilefully corrupt them all Silly rewards for reading Ulysses abound.

    24. Elena on said:

      Not as good as exercises in style, a mix of Marquise de Sade, James Joyce and Jerome K Jerome Dark humor, self analysis and eroticism If this would be attempted to be transformed into a movie, it would be a pornographic Tarantino movie if such a thing exists.

    25. Alessandro Palumbo on said:

      Paradossale e divertente come ci si aspetti che sia ogni opera di Queneau Pi che appartenenti all Irish Republican Army, gli assaltatori dell ufficio postale di Dublino, sembrava l Armata Brancaleone Non l ho trovato onirico come altre sue opere ma merita certamente una lettura

    26. Tosh on said:

      This title is a sister to Boris Vian s I Spit on Your Graves Queneau wrote this for the same publisher under the name Sally Marr I think it was Sally Marr, but maybe I got Morrissey on my brain Nevetheless it s a masterful piece of fiction by one of France s great writers.

    27. Colin Parte on said:

      I came across this book at just the right time, given that it was it set in the Easter Rising in 1916 Elements of what passed for erotica in 1946 along with stereotypical characters made for interesting reading Worth a go on a novelty basis.

    28. Catalina on said:

      Nationalism, heroism, rebellion, everything just pales in front of sexuality Even if considered ironic this book presents us with very true aspects of human nature, differences between sexes, primal instincts, all wrapped in a very funny narrative

    29. Tarrastarr on said:

      very different sort of book not great narration but great story with super interesting characters.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *